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And how should I begin?

Freddie/genderless/non-allo. Use fae/fim/faer/faers/faerself, he/him, or other singular gender-neutral pronouns in reference to me.

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Posts tagged history

Apr 7 '14

art-of-swords:

The Wallace Sword

The Wallace Sword is an antique claymore purported to have belonged to William Wallace (1285–1305), a Scottish knight who led a resistance to the English occupation of Scotland during the Wars of Scottish Independence. It is said to have been used by William Wallace at the Battle of Stirling Bridge in 1297 and the Battle of Falkirk (1298).

The shaft of the sword measures 4 feet 4 inches (132 cm) in length and 5 feet 8 inches (173 cm) including the hilt. The breadth of the blade varies from 2.25 inches (5.7 cm) at the guard to 0.75 inches (1.9 cm) before the point. The sword weighs 6.0 pounds (2.7 kg).

It has been alleged that after William Wallace’s execution in 1305, Sir John de Menteith, governor of Dumbarton Castle received the sword in August of that year. But there are no records to that effect.

Two hundred years later, in 1505, accounts survive which state that at the command of King James IV of Scotland, the sum of 26 shillings was paid to an armourer for the “binding of Wallace’s sword with cords of silk” and providing it with “a new hilt and plomet” and also with a “new scabbard and a new belt”.

This repair would have been necessary because, according to legend, Wallace’s original scabbard, hilt and belt were said to have been made from the dried skin of Hugh Cressingham, one of the English commanders at the Battle of Stirling Bridge.

No other written records of the sword are found for a further three centuries. In 1875 a letter from the War Office informed that the sword, in 1825 was sent to the Tower of London to be repaired. At that time it was submitted to a Dr Samuel Meyrick by the Duke of Wellington for examination.

Dr Meyrick was an authority on ancient swords, but he estimated the age of the sword by examining the mountings only, which as we know were replaced early in the 16th century. Thus he concluded that the sword could not date from earlier than the 15th century. However, he did not take account of the blade, which must have been of some importance for James IV to have it bound in silk and give it a new scabbard, hilt and belt, and it was also described then as the “Wallas sword”.

The sword was recovered from Dumbarton by Charles Rogers, author of The Book of Wallace. Rogers, on 15 October 1888, renewed a correspondence with the Secretary of State for War, with the result that the Major General commanding forces in North Britain was authorised to deliver the weapon to his care for preservation in the Wallace Monument.

There is good reason to believe that this sword as it is now did not belong to William Wallace. The blade does not possess a fuller — a near-universal feature of blades with this type of cross-section (lenticular) except in processional swords of the Renaissance. The blade in its original state would have likely been Oakeshott type XIIIa (also known as Espee de Guerrel or Grete war sword), which became common by the mid-13th century.

Such swords would have a long, wide blade with parallel edges, ending in a rounded or spatulate tip. The grip, longer than in the earlier Scottish swords, typically some 15 cm (almost 6 inches), allows good two-handed use. The cross-guards were probably down-sloping (in the later highland style) or straight, and the pommel either regularly Brazil-nut or disk-shaped but this case perhaps a lobed pommel inspired by the Viking style.

Close inspection reveals that it may be made up from pieces of different swords fitted together. Part of this could have come from a late-13th-century sword. David Caldwell, writes that “Apart from the reshaping of the guard, this sword does not appear untypical of the two-handed swords in use in the lowlands of Scotland in the late sixteenth or early seventeenth centuries.” (page 174) and that the blade has a ricasso, which is not a medieval feature.

However, the blade appears to be made of 3 separate pieces hammer welded together. The bottommost piece has a flattened diamond cross-section, and so perhaps might be a 13th-century sword, and therefore there is some hope for those who think that Wallace’s sword is there.

Source: Copyright 2014 © Wikipedia | Awesome Stories | The Guardian

2,072 notes (via patchworkprogrammer & art-of-swords)Tags: history Scotland Scottish

Mar 25 '14
archiemcphee:

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.
Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.

"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."

[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

archiemcphee:

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.

Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.

"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."

[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

18,739 notes (via thren & archiemcphee)Tags: jewelry beaturiful history that is something to want queue

Mar 13 '14
scienceadded:

fishingboatproceeds:

earthisalie:

carlboygenius:

Correcting Internet DisInformation: The American Space Pen / The Russian Pencil

thank you for this.

And then from his initial investment of >$1,000,000, the Fisher Pen Co. was able to make a lot of money and grow the overall size of the U.S. economy and create lots of jobs.
So essentially a story that is supposed to be about government inefficiency turns out to be a story about how the U.S. government worked with a private company to make space travel safer while also stimulating economic growth.
The moral of the story is not that the Soviet Union was more efficient. The moral of the story is that by failing to allow private investment in innovation, the Soviet Union was doomed.
Incidentally, Paul Fisher, who invented the Fisher space pen, was a fascinating guy. He had this plan to eliminate income and property taxes with a progressive asset tax and even ran for President. And the Fisher Space Pen Co. is still a going concern, still employing people, and still generating a return on Fisher’s million-dollar investment.

And the Russians used …

wait for it …

Fisher Space Pens, because seriously. Fisher deserves a Nobel Prize for that shit.
Also you’d think they would have thought of the whole graphite/pencils shavings thing and used those grease pencils that are sharpened by tearing off a bit of paper (mostly used for eye makeup these days, but

scienceadded:

fishingboatproceeds:

earthisalie:

carlboygenius:

Correcting Internet DisInformation: The American Space Pen / The Russian Pencil

thank you for this.

And then from his initial investment of >$1,000,000, the Fisher Pen Co. was able to make a lot of money and grow the overall size of the U.S. economy and create lots of jobs.

So essentially a story that is supposed to be about government inefficiency turns out to be a story about how the U.S. government worked with a private company to make space travel safer while also stimulating economic growth.

The moral of the story is not that the Soviet Union was more efficient. The moral of the story is that by failing to allow private investment in innovation, the Soviet Union was doomed.

Incidentally, Paul Fisher, who invented the Fisher space pen, was a fascinating guy. He had this plan to eliminate income and property taxes with a progressive asset tax and even ran for President. And the Fisher Space Pen Co. is still a going concern, still employing people, and still generating a return on Fisher’s million-dollar investment.

And the Russians used …

wait for it …

Fisher Space Pens, because seriously. Fisher deserves a Nobel Prize for that shit.

Also you’d think they would have thought of the whole graphite/pencils shavings thing and used those grease pencils that are sharpened by tearing off a bit of paper (mostly used for eye makeup these days, but

105,534 notes (via forwardslashreality & carlboygenius)Tags: history space travel

Mar 12 '14

shavingryansprivates:

remember in 2012 when that lady tried restoring that painting of jesus

image

115,168 notes (via patchworkprogrammer & shavingryansprivates)Tags: no That hurts I didn't know that's what that picture going around was ow history

Mar 12 '14
scienceadded:

fishingboatproceeds:

earthisalie:

carlboygenius:

Correcting Internet DisInformation: The American Space Pen / The Russian Pencil

thank you for this.

And then from his initial investment of >$1,000,000, the Fisher Pen Co. was able to make a lot of money and grow the overall size of the U.S. economy and create lots of jobs.
So essentially a story that is supposed to be about government inefficiency turns out to be a story about how the U.S. government worked with a private company to make space travel safer while also stimulating economic growth.
The moral of the story is not that the Soviet Union was more efficient. The moral of the story is that by failing to allow private investment in innovation, the Soviet Union was doomed.
Incidentally, Paul Fisher, who invented the Fisher space pen, was a fascinating guy. He had this plan to eliminate income and property taxes with a progressive asset tax and even ran for President. And the Fisher Space Pen Co. is still a going concern, still employing people, and still generating a return on Fisher’s million-dollar investment.

And the Russians used …

wait for it …

Fisher Space Pens, because seriously. Fisher deserves a Nobel Prize for that shit.
Also you’d think they would have thought of the whole graphite/pencils shavings thing and used those grease pencils that are sharpened by tearing off a bit of paper (mostly used for eye makeup these days, but

scienceadded:

fishingboatproceeds:

earthisalie:

carlboygenius:

Correcting Internet DisInformation: The American Space Pen / The Russian Pencil

thank you for this.

And then from his initial investment of >$1,000,000, the Fisher Pen Co. was able to make a lot of money and grow the overall size of the U.S. economy and create lots of jobs.

So essentially a story that is supposed to be about government inefficiency turns out to be a story about how the U.S. government worked with a private company to make space travel safer while also stimulating economic growth.

The moral of the story is not that the Soviet Union was more efficient. The moral of the story is that by failing to allow private investment in innovation, the Soviet Union was doomed.

Incidentally, Paul Fisher, who invented the Fisher space pen, was a fascinating guy. He had this plan to eliminate income and property taxes with a progressive asset tax and even ran for President. And the Fisher Space Pen Co. is still a going concern, still employing people, and still generating a return on Fisher’s million-dollar investment.

And the Russians used …

wait for it …

Fisher Space Pens, because seriously. Fisher deserves a Nobel Prize for that shit.

Also you’d think they would have thought of the whole graphite/pencils shavings thing and used those grease pencils that are sharpened by tearing off a bit of paper (mostly used for eye makeup these days, but

105,534 notes (via forwardslashreality & carlboygenius)Tags: history space travel

Dec 26 '13

iamafantasticbeast:

rrueplumet:

i think about this a lot

I will now think about this a lot

(Source: ethelreds)

36,776 notes (via patchworkprogrammer & ethelreds)Tags: history

Nov 22 '13

odditiesoflife:

The Remarkable Dinosaur Footprint Wall

Located 3 miles (5 km) from Sucre, Bolivia is Cal Orko, an imposing limestone slab 0.9 miles (1.5 km) long and over 328 feet (100 m) high. On this steep face with an inclination of 72 degrees, visitors can look back in time to when dinosaurs roamed the Earth over 68 million years ago.

At Cal Orko you will find 462 distinct dinosaur tracks from at least 8 different species, totaling an incredible 5,055 dinosaur footprints. So how do thousands of dinosaur footprints come to be, on a seemingly vertical rock face hundreds of feet high? The location used to be the shore of a former lake, that attracted large numbers of dinosaurs.

The creatures’ feet sank into the shoreline in damp weather, leaving marks that were solidified by later periods of drought. Wet weather then returned, sealing the prints below mud and sediment. The wet-dry pattern was repeated several times, preserving multiple layers of prints. Tectonic upheaval then pushed the flat ground up to the brilliant viewing angle that it is today.

(Source: amusingplanet.com)

18,834 notes (via thescienceofreality & odditiesoflife)Tags: science history dinosaurs

Jun 30 '13

2460onetruepairing:

land-of-greyjoys-and-cannibals:

gallifreyan-starkid:

buzzfeed:

Common Historical Misconceptions

I just don’t know what to believe anymore.

the fact that there is no number 3 bothers me

no one believes me when I tell them about the first bit….

[muffled “everything you know is wrong” playing in the distance.]

52,418 notes (via scooterninja & buzzfeed)Tags: History

Jun 28 '13

besturlonhere:

June 7th, 1942: Edward Hopper completes his best known painting, the seminal Nighthawks. When asked by a Chicago Tribute reporter about the philosophical meaning behind the diner having no clearly visible exits Hopper responded, “Shit. Fuck. I did it again. Goddamnit. Fuck. Not again. I did it again. Shit.” and slammed his hat on his leg.

267,147 notes (via fisto & besturlonhere)Tags: art history art history

Jun 19 '13

xcgirl08:

shoujofeels:

becausetheinternet:

A 2500 year old mummy that had some amazing tattoos.

WHAT.

NO FUCKING WAY.

YO HOLD ON. 

IT GETS BETTER.

This mummy, found in the  Altai mountains of Siberia, is actually that of a young woman who died at about the age of twenty-five; she is thought to have been a member of the Pazyryk tribe.

She was buried with six horses and two similarly-tattooed men (the horned griffon that decorates her shoulder also appears on the man buried closest to her, covering most of his right side), possibly escorts. She was also wearing a horse-hair wig, silk, and elaborate boots, which is all a level of ceremony that would have likely only been accorded to a woman of high rank. You didn’t get inked like this unless you were very important, and had worked your way up to that importance. 

…Hence, of course, the references to her by researchers as ‘The Ukok Princess,’ although due to the lack of weapons in her grave they have concluded that the woman was in fact a healer or a storyteller.  

And now I’m all consumed with curiosity: Who was she? What amazing things did she accomplish? Why these symbols, and what did they mean? Who were the two men alongside her?

The most informative article about it can be found here, although I would completely eat up any other information you guys could find. 

153,947 notes (via surelickholmes & becausetheinternet)Tags: history interesting

Apr 16 '13

REBLOG IF YOU KNOW WHO ANNE FRANK IS

swimminghometothestars:

n00bith:

because jesus fucking christ I need some more faith in humanity right now after seeing that Beiberbot or whatever the fuck they call themselves post

Can’t seriously believe people don’t know who she is.

136,058 notes (via doodleswiththoughts & n00bith)Tags: Anne Frank history

Feb 19 '13

Prehistoric dioramas for the Cairo Ministry of Education by Chase Studios

crankydinosaur:

image

Ediacaran

image

Cambrian

image

Ordovician

image

Silurian

image

Devonian

image

Carboniferous

image

Permian

image

Triassic

image

Jurassic

image

Cretaceous

image

Paleocene

image

Eocene

image

Oligocene

image

Miocene

image

Pliocene

image

Pleistocene

image

Holocene (where we currently are)

(Source: chasestudio.com)

2,231 notes (via infinity-imagined & crankydinosaur)Tags: art prehistory history

Dec 26 '12

The role of women in:

honeyspider:

There are all from the amazing tumblr ancientpeoples which I’m fangirling over. I figured it was easier to link them all like this since the posts are long and then I - and other people - can find them later :)

(Source: manticoreimaginary)

8,082 notes (via thren & manticoreimaginary)Tags: history reference